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Self-Care Tips From a Dental Hygienist

September 20th, 2018

With summer vacations ending and the fall season beginning, it can get so busy that people forget to take care of themselves. That’s why this September, we’re celebrating Self-Care Awareness Month.

I didn’t realize how important self-care was until I became a mother. After having children, I realized that I needed to take care of myself to be a better mom for my family. I changed my eating habits and started exercising so I could have more energy, and I ended up feeling great! Those changes are still part of my life today.

The most important part of self-care is making time for it. In my life, I make time to work out, meditate, and see my doctor for an annual checkup. Even at Aesthetics Dentistry, we plan way in advance so we can go out and enjoy a monthly lunch as an office. Staying healthy has improved my professional life - I miss less working days and I have accountability buddies in the office to encourage me along the way!

Lastly, don’t forget that everybody is different, with different physical capabilities and medical makeups. It’s important to know yourself. Take this month to adjust your sails, preparing for school, holidays, and your dentist appointment. There’s no shame in taking time for self-care so that you can be the best version of yourself.

- Elizabeth Stumpf, Dental Hygienist

What are the five things I should do in between visits?

September 19th, 2018

When it comes to keeping your smile looking its best, good oral hygiene is a must! Good oral health habits should start early and continue throughout your lifetime. Here, Drs. Vahid Varasteh and Mina Kalali and our team at Aesthetic Dentistry suggest five habits worth adopting that will help keep your teeth healthy:

  • Brush and floss regularly. Brush gently at least twice a day, paying special attention to the gum line to rid your mouth of food and bacteria that may lurk in between your teeth. Floss at least once a day. Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if the bristles are frayed.
  • Make regular visits to see Drs. Vahid Varasteh and Mina Kalali. Regular checkups (twice yearly) will help diagnose any dental problems early on when they can be more easily treated.
  • Stop smoking. Did you know smokers are four times as likely as nonsmokers to develop periodontal (gum) disease? Tobacco, whether in the form of cigarettes, pipes, cigars, or chewable tobacco, increases oral and throat cancer risks, and raises the risk for candidiasis, an oral fungal infection. Smokeless tobacco contains sugar, which furthers your risk for cavities.
  • Limit your alcohol intake. Heavy drinking dramatically increases the risk of developing mouth and throat cancers.
  • Eat healthy. Avoid snacking on foods that contain high levels of sugar or starch. We encourage you to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, which are known to help stimulate the flow of saliva to re-mineralize tooth surfaces and neutralize cavity-causing bacteria.

To learn more about the habits you should practice in between your visits to Aesthetic Dentistry, or to schedule an appointment, please give us a call today!

Does smoking affect oral health?

September 12th, 2018

By now, everyone knows that smoking is bad for you. But the truth is its broad-reaching health effects are not all known by everyone. This is especially true of oral health. Smoking can have serious repercussions in this regard. To give you a better idea of how smoking can affect your oral health, Drs. Vahid Varasteh and Mina Kalali and our team have listed some issues that can arise.

Oral Cancer

Oral cancer can have steep ramifications for anyone that gets it. Surgery can be required to eliminate the cancer before it spreads to more vital parts of your body. Any type of cancer is about the worst health effect you can get, and this especially holds true to the affects that smoking has on your mouth. The type of mouth surgery required with oral cancer can leave your face deconstructed in certain areas, and it is all due to smoking or use of other tobacco products.

Tooth Discoloration and Bad Breath

At the very least, it is fair to say that as a smoker you will often have bad breath, and while you may try to cover it up with gum or mints, tooth discoloration is a whole other story. The chemicals and substances in cigarettes stick to your teeth staining them brown and yellow colors that are increasingly difficult to disguise.

Gum Disease and Loss of Bone

Another effect of smoking is the increased risk of gum disease. Your gums may start to recede, which can eventually lead to the loss of teeth. Smoking can also increase bone loss and density in your jaw which is vital to the health of your mouth. Gum disease and bone loss are two signs that smoking is definitely bad for your mouth.

When it comes to the health of your mouth, the question is not whether smoking affects your health, it's how does it affect your health and to what degree. If for no other reason than because smoking involves your mouth as its entry point, it is safe to say that it can have long-lasting and detrimental consequences on your oral health.

To learn more about smoking and your oral health, contact our North Reading office to schedule an appointment with Drs. Vahid Varasteh and Mina Kalali.

What was your favorite part of summer?

September 5th, 2018

It's the end of summer, and fall is just around the corner. Soon the temperatures will cool down, the leaves will start to change, and Drs. Vahid Varasteh and Mina Kalali and our team at Aesthetic Dentistry are sure that you’ll soon be thinking about Halloween costumes and Thanksgiving plans in no time. But wait! First, we want to know about your favorite parts of the summer! Did you go on a wonderful family trip? Did you pick up a new hobby? Did you try to spend as much time outside and in the sun as possible?

Share your favorite memories, stories, or photos with us by leaving a comment below or on our Facebook page.